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Genesis 16:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Now Sarai, Abram's wife, bare him no children: and she had a handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Now Sarai Abram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name [was] Hagar.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now Sarai, Abram’s wife had borne him no [children], and she had an Egyptian maid whose name was Hagar.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Now Sarai, Abram's wife, bore him no children: and she had a handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name [was] Hagar.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And Sarai Abram's wife did not bear him [children]. And she had an Egyptian maidservant; and her name was Hagar.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— But, Sarai, Abram's wife, had borne him no children,—she had, however, an Egyptian handmaid, whose name was Hagar.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And Sarai, Abram's wife, hath not borne to him, and she hath an handmaid, an Egyptian, and her name [is] Hagar;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Now Sarai, the wife of Abram, had brought forth no children: but having a handmaid, an Egyptian, named Agar,
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Now Sarai Abrams wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaide, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And Sarai{gr.Sara} the wife of Abram bore him no children; and she had a Mizraimite{gr.Egyptian} maid, whose name was Hagar{gr.Agar}.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— Now Saray Avram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, a Mitzri, whose name [was] Hagar.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Now ray שָׂרַי 8297
{8297} Prime
שָׂרַי
Saray
{saw-rah'-ee}
From H8269; dominative; Sarai, the wife of Abraham.
Avrm's אַברָם 87
{0087} Prime
אַבְרָם
'Abram
{ab-rawm'}
Contracted from H0048; high father; Abram, the original name of Abraham.
wife 802
{0802} Prime
אִשָּׁה
'ishshah
{ish-shaw'}
The first form is the feminine of H0376 or H0582; the second form is an irregular plural; a woman (used in the same wide sense as H0582).
bare y3205
[3205] Standard
יָלַד
yalad
{yaw-lad'}
A primitive root; to bear young; causatively to beget; medically to act as midwife; specifically to show lineage.
z0
<0000> Grammar
The original word in the Greek or Hebrew is translated by more than one word in the English. The English translation is separated by one or more other words from the original.
him no y3808
[3808] Standard
לֹא
lo'
{lo}
lo; a primitive particle; not (the simple or abstract negation); by implication no; often used with other particles.
children: 3205
{3205} Prime
יָלַד
yalad
{yaw-lad'}
A primitive root; to bear young; causatively to beget; medically to act as midwife; specifically to show lineage.
z8804
<8804> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 12562
x3808
(3808) Complement
לֹא
lo'
{lo}
lo; a primitive particle; not (the simple or abstract negation); by implication no; often used with other particles.
and she had an handmaid, 8198
{8198} Prime
שִׁפְחָה
shiphchah
{shif-khaw'}
Feminine from an unused root meaning to spread out (as a family; see H4940); a female slave (as a member of the household).
a Mixr מִצרִי, 4713
{4713} Prime
מִצְרִי
Mitsriy
{mits-ree'}
From H4714; a Mitsrite, or inhabitant of Mitsrajim.
whose name 8034
{8034} Prime
שֵׁם
shem
{shame}
A primitive word (perhaps rather from H7760 through the idea of definite and conspicuous position; compare H8064); an appellation, as a mark or memorial of individuality; by implication honor, authority, character.
[was] Hqr הָגָר. 1904
{1904} Prime
הָגָר
Hagar
{haw-gawr'}
Of uncertain (perhaps foreign) derivation; Hagar, the mother of Ishmael.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Genesis 16:1

_ _ Genesis 16:1-16. Bestowment of Hagar.

_ _ Now, Sarai ... had a handmaid — a female slave — one of those obtained in Egypt.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Genesis 16:1-3

_ _ We have here the marriage of Abram to Hagar, who was his secondary wife. Herein, though some excuse may be made for him, he cannot be justified, for from the beginning it was not so; and, when it was so, it seems to have proceeded from an irregular desire to build up families for the speedier peopling of the world and the church. Certainly it must not be so now. Christ has reduced this matter to the first institution, and makes the marriage union to be between one man and one woman only. Now,

_ _ I. The maker of this match (would one think it?) was Sarai herself: she said to Abram, I pray thee, go in unto my maid, Genesis 16:2. Note, 1. It is the policy of Satan to tempt us by our nearest and dearest relations, or those friends that we have an opinion of and an affection for. The temptation is most dangerous when it is sent by a hand that is least suspected: it is our wisdom therefore to consider, not so much who speaks as what is spoken. 2. God's commands consult our comfort and honour much better than our own contrivances do. It would have been much more for Sarai's interest if Abram had kept to the rule of God's law instead of being guided by her foolish projects; but we often do ill for ourselves.

_ _ II. The inducement to it was Sarai's barrenness.

_ _ 1. Sarai bare Abram no children. She was very fair (Genesis 12:14), was a very agreeable, dutiful wife, and a sharer with him in his large possessions; and yet written childless. Note, (1.) God dispenses his gifts variously, loading us with benefits, but not overloading us: some cross or other is appointed to be an alloy to great enjoyments. (2.) The mercy of children is often given to the poor and denied to the rich, given to the wicked and denied to good people, though the rich have most to leave them and good people would take most care of their education. God does herein as it has pleased him.

_ _ 2. She owned God's providence in this affliction: The Lord hath restrained me from bearing. Note, (1.) As, where children are, it is God that gives them (Genesis 33:5), so where they are wanted it is he that withholds them, Genesis 30:2. This evil is of the Lord. (2.) It becomes us to acknowledge this, that we may bear it, and improve it, as an affliction of his ordering for wise and holy ends.

_ _ 3. She used this as an argument with Abram to marry his maid; and he was prevailed upon by this argument to do it. Note, (1.) When our hearts are too much set upon any creature-comfort, we are easily put upon the use of indirect methods for the obtaining of it. Inordinate desires commonly produce irregular endeavours. If our wishes be not kept in a submission to God's providence, our pursuits will scarcely be kept under the restraints of his precepts. (2.) It is for want of a firm dependence upon God's promise, and a patient waiting for God's time, that we go out of the way of our duty to catch at expected mercy. He that believes does not make haste.

_ _ 4. Abram's compliance with Sarai's proposal, we have reason to think, was from an earnest desire of the promised seed, on whom the covenant should be entailed. God had told him that his heir should be a son of his body, but had not yet told him that it should be a son by Sarai; therefore he thought, “Why not by Hagar, since Sarai herself proposed it?” Note, (1.) Foul temptations may have very fair pretenses, and be coloured with that which is very plausible. (2.) Fleshly wisdom, as it anticipates God's time of mercy, so it puts us out of God's way. (3.) This would be happily prevented if we would ask counsel of God by the word and by prayer, before we attempt that which is important and suspicious. Herein Abram was wanting; he married without God's consent. This persuasion came not of him that called him.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Genesis 16:1

We have here the marriage of Abram to Hagar, who was his secondary wife. Herein, though he may be excused, he cannot be justified; for from the beginning it was not so: and when it was so, it seems to have proceeded from an irregular desire to build up their families, for the speedier peopling of the world. But now we must not do so? Christ has reduced this matter to the first institution, and makes the marriage union to be between one man and one woman only.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Genesis 16:1

Now (a) Sarai Abram's wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name [was] Hagar.

(a) It seems that she had respect for God's promise, which could not be accomplished without issue.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
am 2092, bc 1912

bare:

Genesis 15:2-3 And Abram said, Lord GOD, what wilt thou give me, seeing I go childless, and the steward of my house [is] this Eliezer of Damascus? ... And Abram said, Behold, to me thou hast given no seed: and, lo, one born in my house is mine heir.
Genesis 21:10 Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, [even] with Isaac.
Genesis 21:12 And God said unto Abraham, Let it not be grievous in thy sight because of the lad, and because of thy bondwoman; in all that Sarah hath said unto thee, hearken unto her voice; for in Isaac shall thy seed be called.
Genesis 25:21 And Isaac intreated the LORD for his wife, because she [was] barren: and the LORD was intreated of him, and Rebekah his wife conceived.
Judges 13:2 And there was a certain man of Zorah, of the family of the Danites, whose name [was] Manoah; and his wife [was] barren, and bare not.
Luke 1:7 And they had no child, because that Elisabeth was barren, and they both were [now] well stricken in years.
Luke 1:36 And, behold, thy cousin Elisabeth, she hath also conceived a son in her old age: and this is the sixth month with her, who was called barren.

Egyptian:

Genesis 12:16 And he entreated Abram well for her sake: and he had sheep, and oxen, and he asses, and menservants, and maidservants, and she asses, and camels.
Genesis 21:9 And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, which she had born unto Abraham, mocking.
Genesis 21:21 And he dwelt in the wilderness of Paran: and his mother took him a wife out of the land of Egypt.

name:

Galatians 4:24 Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar.
, Agar
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Gn 12:16; 15:2; 21:9, 10, 12, 21; 25:21. Jg 13:2. Lk 1:7, 36. Ga 4:24.

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