Parallel Bible VersionsHebrew Bible Study Tools

Genesis 20:8 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ear. And the men were sore afraid.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Therefore Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ears: and the men were sore afraid.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— So Abimelech arose early in the morning and called all his servants and told all these things in their hearing; and the men were greatly frightened.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Therefore Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ears: and the men were greatly afraid.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and spoke all these words in their ears; and the men were greatly afraid.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— So Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and spake all these words in their ears,—and the men feared greatly.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And Abimelech riseth early in the morning, and calleth for all his servants, and speaketh all these words in their ears; and the men fear exceedingly;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And Abimelech forthwith rising up in the night, called all his servants: and spoke all these words in their hearing, and all the men were exceedingly afraid.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Therefore Abimelech rose earely in the morning, and called all his seruants, and told all these things in their eares: and the men were sore afraid.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and he spoke all these words in their ears, and all the men feared exceedingly.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— Therefore Avimelekh rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ears: and the men were sore afraid.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Therefore “Įvīmele¢ אֲבִימֶלֶך 40
{0040} Prime
אֲבִימֶלֶךְ
'Abiymelek
{ab-ee-mel'-ek}
From H0001 and H4428; father of (the) king; Abimelek, the name of two Philistine kings and of two Israelites.
rose early 7925
{7925} Prime
שָׁכַם
shakam
{shaw-kam'}
A primitive root; properly to incline (the shoulder to a burden); but used only as denominative from H7926; literally to load up (on the back of man or beast), that is, to start early in the morning.
z8686
<8686> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 4046
in the morning, 1242
{1242} Prime
בֹּקֶר
boqer
{bo'-ker}
From H1239; properly dawn (as the break of day); generally morning.
and called 7121
{7121} Prime
קָרָא
qara'
{kaw-raw'}
A primitive root (rather identical with H7122 through the idea of accosting a person met); to call out to (that is, properly address by name, but used in a wide variety of applications).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
all x3605
(3605) Complement
כֹּל
kol
{kole}
From H3634; properly the whole; hence all, any or every (in the singular only, but often in a plural sense).
his servants, 5650
{5650} Prime
עֶבֶד
`ebed
{eh'-bed}
From H5647; a servant.
and told 1696
{1696} Prime
דִּבֵּר
dabar
{daw-bar'}
A primitive root; perhaps properly to arrange; but used figuratively (of words) to speak; rarely (in a destructive sense) to subdue.
z8762
<8762> Grammar
Stem - Piel (See H8840)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 2447
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
all x3605
(3605) Complement
כֹּל
kol
{kole}
From H3634; properly the whole; hence all, any or every (in the singular only, but often in a plural sense).
these x428
(0428) Complement
אֵלֶּה
'el-leh
{ale'-leh}
Prolonged from H0411; these or those.
things 1697
{1697} Prime
דָּבָר
dabar
{daw-baw'}
From H1696; a word; by implication a matter (as spoken of) or thing; adverbially a cause.
in their ears: 241
{0241} Prime
אֹזֶן
'ozen
{o'-zen}
From H0238; broadness, that is, (concretely) the ear (from its form in man).
and the men y582
[0582] Standard
אֱנוֹשׁ
'enowsh
{en-oshe'}
From H0605; properly a mortal (and thus differeing from the more dignified H0120); hence a man in general (singly or collectively). It is often unexpressed in the English Version, especially when used in apposition with another word.
x376
(0376) Complement
אִישׁ
'iysh
{eesh}
Contracted for H0582 (or perhaps rather from an unused root meaning to be extant); a man as an individual or a male person; often used as an adjunct to a more definite term (and in such cases frequently not expressed in translation.).
were sore y3966
[3966] Standard
מְאֹד
m@`od
{meh-ode'}
From the same as H0181; properly vehemence, that is, (with or without preposition) vehemently; by implication wholly, speedily, etc. (often with other words as an intensive or superlative; especially when repeated).
afraid. 3372
{3372} Prime
יָרֵא
yare'
{yaw-ray'}
A primitive root; to fear; morally to revere; causatively to frighten.
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
x3966
(3966) Complement
מְאֹד
m@`od
{meh-ode'}
From the same as H0181; properly vehemence, that is, (with or without preposition) vehemently; by implication wholly, speedily, etc. (often with other words as an intensive or superlative; especially when repeated).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

[[no comment]]

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Genesis 20:8-13

_ _ Abimelech, being thus warned of God in a dream, takes the warning, and, as one truly afraid of sin and its consequences, he rises early to obey the directions given him.

_ _ I. He has a caution for his servants, Genesis 20:8. Abraham himself could not be more careful than he was to command his household in this matter. Note, Those whom God has convinced of sin and danger ought to tell others what God has done for their souls, that they also may be awakened and brought to a like holy fear.

_ _ II. He has a chiding for Abraham. Observe,

_ _ 1. The serious reproof which Abimelech gave to Abraham, Genesis 20:9, Genesis 20:10. His reasoning with Abraham upon this occasion was very strong, and yet very mild. Nothing could be said better; he does not reproach him, nor insult over him, does not say, “Is this your profession? I see, though you will not swear, you will lie. If these be prophets, I will beg to be freed from the sight of them:” but he fairly represents the injury Abraham had done him, and calmly signifies his resentment of it. (1.) He calls that sin which he now found he had been in danger of a great sin. Note, Even the light of nature teaches men that the sin of adultery is a very great sin: be it observed, to the shame of many who call themselves Christians, and yet make a light matter of it. (2.) He looks upon it that both himself and his kingdom would have been exposed to the wrath of God if he had been guilty of this sin, though ignorantly. Note, The sins of kings often prove the plagues of kingdoms; rulers should therefore, for their people's sake, dread sin. (3.) He charges Abraham with doing that which was not justifiable, in disowning his marriage. This he speaks of justly, and yet tenderly; he does not call him a liar and cheat, but tells him he had done deeds that ought not to be done. Note, Equivocation and dissimulation, however they may be palliated, are very bad things, and by no means to be admitted in any case. (4.) He takes it as a very great injury to himself and his family that Abraham had thus exposed them to sin: “What have I offended thee? If I had been thy worst enemy, thou couldst not have done me a worse turn, nor taken a more effectual course to be revenged on me.” Note, We ought to reckon that those do us the greatest unkindness in the world that any way tempt us or expose us to sin, though they may pretend friendship, and offer that which is grateful enough to corrupt nature. (5.) He challenges him to assign a cause for his suspecting them as a dangerous people for an honest man to live among: “What sawest thou, that thou hast done this thing? Genesis 20:10. What reason hadst thou to think that if we had known her to be thy wife thou wouldst have been exposed to any danger by it?” Note, A suspicion of our goodness is justly reckoned a greater affront than a slight upon our greatness.

_ _ 2. The poor excuse that Abraham made for himself.

_ _ (1.) He pleaded the bad opinion he had of the place, Genesis 20:11. He thought within himself (though he could not give any good reason for his thinking so), “Surely the fear of God is not in this place, and then they will slay me.” [1.] Little good is to be expected where no fear of God is. See Psalms 36:1. [2.] There are many places and persons that have more of the fear of God in them than we think they have: perhaps they are not called by our dividing name, they do not wear our badges, they do not tie themselves to that which we have an opinion of; and therefore we conclude they have not the fear of God in their hearts, which is very injurious both of Christ and Christians, and makes us obnoxious to God's judgment, Matthew 7:1. [3.] Uncharitableness and censoriousness are sins that are the cause of many other sins. When men have once persuaded themselves concerning such and such that they have not the fear of God, they think this will justify them in the most unjust and unchristian practices towards them. Men would not do ill if they did not first think ill.

_ _ (2.) He excused it from the guilt of a downright lie by making it out that, in a sense, she was his sister, Genesis 20:12. Some think she was own sister to Lot, who is called his brother Lot (Genesis 14:16), though he was his nephew; so Sarah is called his sister. But those to whom he said, She is my sister, understood that she was so his sister as not to be capable of being his wife; so that it was an equivocation, with an intent to deceive.

_ _ (3.) He clears himself from the imputation of an affront designed to Abimelech in it by alleging that it had been his practice before, according to an agreement between him and his wife, when they first became sojourners (Genesis 20:13): “When God caused me to wander from my father's house, then we settled this matter.” Note, [1.] God is to be acknowledged in all our wanderings. [2.] Those that travel abroad, and converse much with strangers, as they have need of the wisdom of the serpent, so it is requisite that that wisdom be ever tempered with the innocence of the dove. It may, for aught I know, be suggested that God denied to Abraham to punish them for this sinful compact if they will not own their marriage, why should God own it? But we may suppose that, after this reproof which Abimelech gave them, they agreed never to do so again, and then presently we read (Genesis 21:1, Genesis 21:2) that Sarah conceived.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

[[no comment]]

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

[[no comment]]

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
[No cross-references for this verse.]
Random Bible VersesNew Quotes



Chain-Reference Bible Search

[no cross-references ascribed to this verse]

Newest Chat Bible Comment
Comment HereComplete Biblical ResearchComplete Chat Bible Commentary
Please post your comment on Genesis 20:8.
Name:

WWW Chat Bible Commentary

User-Posted Comments on Genesis 20:8


Recent Chat Bible Comments