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Genesis 25:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And Abraham took another wife, and her name was Keturah.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Then again Abraham took a wife, and her name [was] Keturah.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Now Abraham took another wife, whose name was Keturah.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Then again Abraham took a wife, and her name [was] Keturah.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And Abraham took another wife named Keturah.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And Abraham took another wife, and, her name, was Keturah;
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And Abraham addeth and taketh a wife, and her name [is] Keturah;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And Abraham married another wife named Cetura:
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Then againe Abraham tooke a wife, & her name was Keturah.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And Abraham{gr.Abraam} again took a wife, whose name was Chettura.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— Then again Avraham took a wife, and her name [was] Qeturah.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Then again 3254
{3254} Prime
יָסַף
yacaph
{yaw-saf'}
A primitive root; to add or augment (often adverbially to continue to do a thing).
z8686
<8686> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 4046
Avrhm אַברָהָם 85
{0085} Prime
אַבְרָהָם
'Abraham
{ab-raw-hawm'}
Contracted from H0001 and an unused root (probably meaning to be populous); father of a multitude; Abraham, the later name of Abram.
took 3947
{3947} Prime
לָקַח
laqach
{law-kakh'}
A primitive root; to take (in the widest variety of applications).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
a wife, 802
{0802} Prime
אִשָּׁה
'ishshah
{ish-shaw'}
The first form is the feminine of H0376 or H0582; the second form is an irregular plural; a woman (used in the same wide sense as H0582).
and her name 8034
{8034} Prime
שֵׁם
shem
{shame}
A primitive word (perhaps rather from H7760 through the idea of definite and conspicuous position; compare H8064); an appellation, as a mark or memorial of individuality; by implication honor, authority, character.
[was] K+r קְטוּרָה. 6989
{6989} Prime
קְטוּרָה
Q@tuwrah
{ket-oo-raw'}
Feminine passive participle of H6999; perfumed; Keturah, a wife of Abraham.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Genesis 25:1

_ _ Genesis 25:1-6. Sons of Abraham.

_ _ Abraham took a wife — rather, “had taken”; for Keturah is called Abraham’s concubine, or secondary wife (1 Chronicles 1:32); and as, from her bearing six sons to him, it is improbable that he married after Sarah’s death; and also as he sent them all out to seek their own independence, during his lifetime, it is clear that this marriage is related here out of its chronological order, merely to form a proper winding up of the patriarch’s history.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Genesis 25:1-10

_ _ Abraham lived, after the marriage of Isaac, thirty-five years, and all that is recorded concerning him during the time lies here in a very few verses. We hear no more of God's extraordinary appearances to him or trials of him; for all the days, even of the best and greatest saints, are not eminent days, some slide on silently, and neither come nor go with observation; such were these last days of Abraham. We have here,

_ _ I. An account of his children by Keturah, another wife whom he married after the death of Sarah. He had buried Sarah and married Isaac, the two dear companions of his life, and was now solitary. He wanted a nurse, his family wanted a governess, and it was not good for him to be thus alone. He therefore marries Keturah, probably the chief of his maid-servants, born in his house or bought with money. Marriage is not forbidden to old age. By her he had six sons, in whom the promise made to Abraham concerning the great increase of his posterity was in part fulfilled, which, it is likely, he had an eye to this marriage. The strength he received by the promise still remained in him, to show how much the virtue of the promise exceeds the power of nature.

_ _ II. The disposition which Abraham made of his estate, Genesis 25:5, Genesis 25:6. After the birth of these sons, he set his house in order, with prudence and justice. 1. He made Isaac his heir, as he was bound to do, in justice to Sarah his first and principal wife, and to Rebekah who married Isaac upon the assurance of it, Genesis 24:36. In this all, which he settled upon Isaac, are perhaps included the promise of the land of Canaan, and the entail of the covenant. Or, God having already made him the heir of the promise, Abraham therefore made him heir of his estate. Our affection and gifts should attend God's. 2. He gave portions to the rest of his children, both to Ishmael, though at first he was sent empty away, and to his sons by Keturah. It was justice to provide for them; parents that do not imitate him in this are worse than infidels. It was prudence to settle them in places distant from Isaac, that they might not pretend to divide the inheritance with him, nor be in any way a care or expense to him. Observe, He did this while he yet lived, lest it should not be done, or not so well done, afterwards. Note, In many cases it is wisdom for men to make their own hands their executors, and what they find to do to do it while they live, as far as they can. These sons of the concubines were sent into the country that lay east from Canaan, and their posterity were called the children of the east, famous for their numbers, Judges 6:5, Judges 6:33. Their great increase was the fruit of the promise made to Abraham, that God would multiply his seed. God, in dispensing his blessings, does as Abraham did; common blessings he gives to the children of this world, as to the sons of the bond-woman, but covenant-blessings he reserves for the heirs of promise. All that he has is theirs, for they are his Isaacs, from whom the rest shall be for ever separated.

_ _ III. The age and death of Abraham, Genesis 25:7, Genesis 25:8. He lived 175 years, just 100 years after he came to Canaan; so long he was a sojourner in a strange country. Though he lived long and lived well, though he did good and could ill be spared, yet he died at last. Observe how his death is here described. 1. He gave up the ghost. Hes life was not extorted from him, but he cheerfully resigned it; into the hands of the Father of spirits he committed his spirit. 2. He died in a good old age, an old man; so God had promised him. His death was his discharge from the burdens of his age: an old man would not so live always. It was also the crown of the glory of his old age. 3. He was full of years, or full of life (as it might be supplied), including all the conveniences and comforts of life. He did not live till the world was weary of him, but till he was weary of the world; he had had enough of it, and desired no more. Vixi quantum satis estI have lived long enough. A good man, though he should not die old, dies full of days, satisfied with living here, and longing to live in a better place. 4. He was gathered to his people. His body was gathered to the congregation of the dead, and his soul to the congregation of the blessed. Note, Death gathers us to our people. Those that are our people while we live, whether the people of God or the children of this world, are the people to whom death will gather us.

_ _ IV. His burial, Genesis 25:9, Genesis 25:10. Here is nothing recorded of the pomp or ceremony of his funeral; only we are told, 1. Who buried him: His sons Isaac and Ishmael. It was the last office of respect they had to pay to their good father. Some distance there had formerly been between Isaac and Ishmael; but it seems either that Abraham had himself brought them together while he lived, or at least that his death reconciled them. 2. Where they buried him: in his own burying-place, which he had purchased, and in which he had buried Sarah. Note, Those that in life have been very dear to each other may not only innocently, but laudably, desire to be buried together, that in their deaths they may not be divided, and in token of their hopes of rising together.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Genesis 25:1

Five and thirty years Abraham lived after the marriage of Isaac, and all that is recorded concerning him during that time lies here in a very few verses: we hear no more of God's extraordinary appearances to him, or trials of him; for all the days even of the greatest saints are not eminent days, some slide on silently, and neither come nor go with observation: such were these last days of Abraham. We have here an account of his children by Keturah, another wife, which be married after the death of Sarah. He had buried Sarah, and married Isaac, the two dear companions of his life, and was now solitary; his family wanted a governess and it was not good for him to he thus alone; he therefore marries Keturah, probably the chief of his maid servants, born in his house, or bought with money. By her he had six sons, in whom the promise made to Abraham concerning the great increase of his posterity was in part fulfilled. The strength he received by the promise still remained in him, to shew how much the virtue of the promise exceeds the power of nature.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Genesis 25:1

Then again Abraham (a) took a wife, and her name [was] Keturah.

(a) While Sarah was yet alive.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
am cir, 2151, bc cir, 1853,
Genesis 23:1-2 And Sarah was an hundred and seven and twenty years old: [these were] the years of the life of Sarah. ... And Sarah died in Kirjatharba; the same [is] Hebron in the land of Canaan: and Abraham came to mourn for Sarah, and to weep for her.
Genesis 28:1 And Isaac called Jacob, and blessed him, and charged him, and said unto him, Thou shalt not take a wife of the daughters of Canaan.
1 Chronicles 1:32-33 Now the sons of Keturah, Abraham's concubine: she bare Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian, and Ishbak, and Shuah. And the sons of Jokshan; Sheba, and Dedan. ... And the sons of Midian; Ephah, and Epher, and Henoch, and Abida, and Eldaah. All these [are] the sons of Keturah.
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Gn 23:1; 28:1. 1Ch 1:32.

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