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Genesis 41:9 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— Then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— Then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Then the chief cupbearer spoke to Pharaoh, saying, “I would make mention today of my [own] offenses.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— Then spoke the chief butler to Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— Then spoke the chief of the cup-bearers to Pharaoh, saying, I remember mine offences this day.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— Then spake the chief of the butlers with Pharaoh, saying, My faults, would, I, mention this day.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And the chief of the butlers speaketh with Pharaoh, saying, 'My sin I mention this day:
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Then at length the chief butler remembering, said: I confess my sin:
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— Then spake the chiefe Butler vnto Pharaoh, saying, I doe remember my faults this day.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And the chief cupbearer spoke to Pharaoh{gr.Pharao}, saying, I this day remember my fault:
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— Then spake the chief butler unto Paroh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
Then spake 1696
{1696} Prime
דִּבֵּר
dabar
{daw-bar'}
A primitive root; perhaps properly to arrange; but used figuratively (of words) to speak; rarely (in a destructive sense) to subdue.
z8762
<8762> Grammar
Stem - Piel (See H8840)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 2447
the chief 8269
{8269} Prime
שַׂר
sar
{sar}
From H8323; a head person (of any rank or class).
butler y8248
[8248] Standard
שָׁקָה
shaqah
{shaw-kaw'}
A primitive root; to quaff, that is, (causatively) to irrigate or furnish a potion to.
z8688
<8688> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Participle (See H8813)
Count - 857
x4945
(4945) Complement
מַשְׁקֶה
mashqeh
{mash-keh'}
From H8248; properly causing to drink, that is, a butler; by implication (intransitively) drink (itself); figuratively a well watered region.
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
unto Par` פַּרעֹה, 6547
{6547} Prime
פַּרְעֹה
Par`oh
{par-o'}
Of Egyptian derivation; Paroh, a generic title of Egyptian kings.
saying, 559
{0559} Prime
אָמַר
'amar
{aw-mar'}
A primitive root; to say (used with great latitude).
z8800
<8800> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Infinitive (See H8812)
Count - 4888
I x589
(0589) Complement
אֲנִי
'aniy
{an-ee'}
Contracted from H0595; I.
do remember 2142
{2142} Prime
זָכַר
zakar
{zaw-kar'}
A primitive root; properly to mark (so as to be recognized), that is, to remember; by implication to mention; also (as denominative from H2145) to be male.
z8688
<8688> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Participle (See H8813)
Count - 857
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
my faults 2399
{2399} Prime
חֵטְא
chet'
{khate}
From H2398; a crime or its penalty.
this day: 3117
{3117} Prime
יוֹם
yowm
{yome}
From an unused root meaning to be hot; a day (as the warm hours), whether literally (from sunrise to sunset, or from one sunset to the next), or figuratively (a space of time defined by an associated term), (often used adverbially).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Genesis 41:9-13

_ _ then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults — This public acknowledgment of the merits of the young Hebrew would, tardy though it was, have reflected credit on the butler had it not been obviously made to ingratiate himself with his royal master. It is right to confess our faults against God, and against our fellow men when that confession is made in the spirit of godly sorrow and penitence. But this man was not much impressed with a sense of the fault he had committed against Joseph; he never thought of God, to whose goodness he was indebted for the prophetic announcement of his release, and in acknowledging his former fault against the king, he was practising the courtly art of pleasing his master.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Genesis 41:9-16

_ _ Here is, 1. The recommending of Joseph to Pharaoh for an interpreter. The chief butler did it more in compliment to Pharaoh, to oblige him, than in gratitude to Joseph, or in compassion for his case. He makes a fair confession (Genesis 41:9): “I remember my faults this day, in forgetting Joseph.” Note, It is best to remember our duty, and to do it in its time; but, if we have neglected that, it is next best to remember our faults, and repent of them, and do our duty at last; better late than never. Some think he means his faults against Pharaoh, for which he was imprisoned; and then he would insinuate that, though Pharaoh had forgiven him, he had not forgiven himself. The story he had to tell was, in short, That there was an obscure young man in the king's prison, who had very properly interpreted his dream, and the chief baker's (the event corresponding in each with the interpretation), and that he would recommend him to the king his master for an interpreter. Note, God's time for the enlargement of his people will appear at last to be the fittest time. If the chief butler had at first used his interest for Joseph's enlargement, and had obtained it, it is probable that upon his release he would have gone back to the land of the Hebrews again, which he spoke of so feelingly (Genesis 40:15), and then he would neither have been so blessed himself, nor such a blessing to his family, as afterwards he proved. But staying two years longer, and coming out now upon this occasion, at last, to interpret the king's dreams, way was made for his very great preferment. Those that patiently wait for God shall be paid for their waiting, not only principal but interest, Lamentations 3:26. 2. The introducing of Joseph to Pharaoh. The king's business requires haste. Joseph is sent for out of the dungeon with all speed; Pharaoh's order discharged him both from his imprisonment and from his servitude, and made him a candidate for some of the highest trusts at court. The king can scarcely allow him time, but that decency required it, to shave himself, and to change his raiment, Genesis 41:14. It is done with all possible expedition, and Joseph is brought in, perhaps almost as much surprised as Peter was, Acts 12:9. So suddenly is his captivity brought back that he is as one that dreams, Psalms 126:1. Pharaoh immediately, without enquiring who or whence he was, tells him his business, that he expected he should interpret his dream, Genesis 41:15. To which, Joseph makes him a very modest decent reply, (Genesis 41:16), in which, (1.) He gives honour to God. “It is not in me, God must give it.” Note, Great gifts appear most graceful and illustrious when those that have them use them humbly, and take not the praise of them to themselves, but give it to God. To such God gives more grace. (2.) He shows respect to Pharaoh, and hearty good-will to him and his government, in supposing that the interpretation would be an answer of peace. Note, Those that consult God's oracles may expect an answer of peace. If Joseph be made the interpreter, hope the best.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Genesis 41:9

I remember my faults this day — in forgetting Joseph. Some think he means his faults against Pharaoh, for which he was imprisoned, and then he would insinuate, that through Pharaoh had forgiven him, he had not forgiven himself. God's time for the enlargement of his people will appear, at last, to be the fittest time. If the chief butler had at first used his interest for Joseph's enlargement, and had obtained, it is probable, he would have gone back to the land of the Hebrews, and then he had neither been so blessed himself, nor such a blessing to his family. But staying two years longer, and coming out upon this occasion to interpret the king's dreams, way was made for his preferment. The king can scarce allow him time, but that decency required it, to shave himself, and to change his raiment, Genesis 41:14. It is done with all possible expedition, and Joseph is brought in perhaps almost as much surprised as Peter was, Acts 12:9, so suddenly is his captivity brought back, that he is as one that dreams, Psalms 126:1. Pharaoh immediately, without enquiring who or whence he was tells him his business, that he expected he should interpret his dream.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Genesis 41:9

Then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I (e) do remember my faults this day:

(e) He confesses his fault against the king before he speaks of Joseph.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
I do remember:

Genesis 40:1-3 And it came to pass after these things, [that] the butler of the king of Egypt and [his] baker had offended their lord the king of Egypt. ... And he put them in ward in the house of the captain of the guard, into the prison, the place where Joseph [was] bound.
Genesis 40:14 But think on me when it shall be well with thee, and shew kindness, I pray thee, unto me, and make mention of me unto Pharaoh, and bring me out of this house:
Genesis 40:23 Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgat him.
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Gn 40:1, 14, 23.

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