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Genesis 8:6 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made:
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— Then it came about at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made;
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made:
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— And it came to pass at the end of forty days that Noah opened the window of the ark which he had made.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— And it came to pass, at the end of forty days, that Noah opened the window of the ark that he had made;
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— And it cometh to pass, at the end of forty days, that Noah openeth the window of the ark which he made,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— And after that forty days were passed, Noe opening the window of the ark, which he had made, sent forth a raven:
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And it came to passe at the end of forty dayes, that Noah opened the window of the Arke which he had made.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— And it came to pass after forty days Noah{gr.Noe} opened the window of the ark which he had made.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— And it came to pass at the end of forty days, that Noach opened the window of the ark which he had made:

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And it came to pass x1961
(1961) Complement
הָיָה
hayah
{haw-yaw'}
A primitive root (compare H1933); to exist, that is, be or become, come to pass (always emphatic, and not a mere copula or auxiliary).
at the end 7093
{7093} Prime
קֵץ
qets
{kates}
Contracted from H7112; an extremity; adverbially (with prepositional prefix) after.
x4480
(4480) Complement
מִן
min
{min}
For H4482; properly a part of; hence (prepositionally), from or out of in many senses.
of forty 705
{0705} Prime
אַרְבָּעִים
'arba`iym
{ar-baw-eem'}
Multiple of H0702; forty.
days, 3117
{3117} Prime
יוֹם
yowm
{yome}
From an unused root meaning to be hot; a day (as the warm hours), whether literally (from sunrise to sunset, or from one sunset to the next), or figuratively (a space of time defined by an associated term), (often used adverbially).
that N נֹחַ 5146
{5146} Prime
נֹחַ
Noach
{no'-akh}
The same as H5118; rest; Noach, the patriarch of the flood.
opened 6605
{6605} Prime
פָּתַח
pathach
{paw-thakh'}
A primitive root; to open wide (literally or figuratively); specifically to loosen, begin, plough, carve.
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
the window 2474
{2474} Prime
חַלּוֹן
challown
{khal-lone'}
A window (as perforated).
of the ark 8392
{8392} Prime
תֵּבָה
tebah
{tay-baw'}
Perhaps of foreign derivation; a box.
which x834
(0834) Complement
אֲשֶׁר
'asher
{ash-er'}
A primitive relative pronoun (of every gender and number); who, which, what, that; also (as adverb and conjunction) when, where, how, because, in order that, etc.
he had made: 6213
{6213} Prime
עָשָׂה
`asah
{aw-saw'}
A primitive root; to do or make, in the broadest sense and widest application.
z8804
<8804> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 12562
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Genesis 8:6

_ _ at the end of forty days — It is easy to imagine the ardent longing Noah and his family must have felt to enjoy again the sight of land as well as breathe the fresh air; and it was perfectly consistent with faith and patience to make inquiries whether the earth was yet ready.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Genesis 8:6-12

_ _ We have here an account of the spies which Noah sent forth to bring him intelligence from abroad, a raven and a dove. Observe here,

_ _ I. That though God had told Noah particularly when the flood would come, even to a day (Genesis 7:4), yet he did not give him a particular account by revelation at what times, and by what steps, it should go away, 1. Because the knowledge of the former was necessary to his preparing the ark, and settling himself in it; but the knowledge of the latter would serve only to gratify his curiosity, and the concealing of it from him would be the needful exercise of his faith and patience. And, 2. He could not foresee the flood, but by revelation; but he might, by ordinary means, discover the decrease of it, and therefore God was pleased to leave him to the use of them.

_ _ II. That though Noah by faith expected his enlargement, and by patience waited for it, yet he was inquisitive concerning it, as one that thought it long to be thus confined. Note, Desires of release out of trouble, earnest expectations of it, and enquiries concerning its advances towards us, will very well consist with the sincerity of faith and patience. He that believes does not make haste to run before God, but he does make haste to go forth to meet him, Isaiah 28:16. Particularly, 1. Noah sent forth a raven through the window of the ark, which went forth, as the Hebrew phrase is, going forth and returning, that is, flying about, and feeding on the carcases that floated, but returning to the ark for rest; probably not in it, but upon it. This gave Noah little satisfaction; therefore, 2. He sent forth a dove, which returned the first time with no good news, but probably wet and dirty; but, the second time, she brought an olive-leaf in her bill, which appeared to be first plucked off, a plain indication that now the trees, the fruit-trees, began to appear above water. Note here, (1.) That Noah sent forth the dove the second time seven days after the first time, and the third time was after seven days too; and probably the first sending of her out was seven days after the sending forth of the raven. This intimates that it was done on the sabbath day, which, it should seem, Noah religiously observed in the ark. Having kept the sabbath in a solemn assembly of his little church, he then expected special blessings from heaven, and enquired concerning them. Having directed his prayer, he looked up, Psalms 5:3. (2.) The dove is an emblem of a gracious soul, which finding no rest for its foot, no solid peace or satisfaction in this world, this deluged defiling world, returns to Christ as to its ark, as to its Noah. The carnal heart, like the raven, takes up with the world, and feeds on the carrions it finds there; but return thou to thy rest, O my soul, to thy Noah, so the word is, Psalms 116:7. O that I had wings like a dove, to flee to him! Psalms 55:6. And as Noah put forth his hand, and took the dove, and pulled her in to him, into the ark, so Christ will graciously preserve, and help, and welcome, those that fly to him for rest. (3.) The olive-branch, which was an emblem of peace, was brought, not by the raven, a bird of prey, nor by a gay and proud peacock, but by a mild, patient, humble dove. It is a dove-like disposition that brings into the world earnests of rest and joy. (4.) Some make these things an allegory. The law was first sent forth like the raven, but brought no tidings of the assuaging of the waters of God's wrath, with which the world of mankind was deluged; therefore, in the fulness of time, God sent forth his gospel, as the dove, in the likeness of which the Holy Spirit descended, and this presents us with an olive-branch and brings in a better hope.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

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Geneva Bible Translation Notes

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Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
opened the window:

Genesis 6:16 A window shalt thou make to the ark, and in a cubit shalt thou finish it above; and the door of the ark shalt thou set in the side thereof; [with] lower, second, and third [stories] shalt thou make it.
Daniel 6:10 Now when Daniel knew that the writing was signed, he went into his house; and his windows being open in his chamber toward Jerusalem, he kneeled upon his knees three times a day, and prayed, and gave thanks before his God, as he did aforetime.
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Gn 6:16. Dn 6:10.

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