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Leviticus 11:17 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— and the little owl and the cormorant and the great owl,
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— and the owl, and the gannet, and the ibis,
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— and the pelican, and the gannet, and the bittern;
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— and the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— The screech owl, and the cormorant, and the ibis.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— And the little Owle, and the Cormorant, and the great Owle,
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— and the night-raven and the cormorant and the stork,
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
And the little owl, 3563
{3563} Prime
כּוֹס
kowc
{koce}
From an unused root meaning to hold together; a cup (as a container), often figuratively a lot (as if a potion); also some unclean bird, probably an owl (perhaps from the cup like cavity of its eye).
and the cormorant, 7994
{7994} Prime
שָׁלָךְ
shalak
{shaw-lawk'}
From H7993; bird of prey, usually thought to be the pelican (from casting itself into the sea).
and the great owl, 3244
{3244} Prime
יַנְשׁוּף
yanshuwph
{yan-shoof'}
Apparently from H4398; an unclean (aquatic) bird; probably the heron (perhaps from its blowing cry, or because the night heron is meant (compare H5399)).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

See commentary on Leviticus 11:13-19.


Leviticus 11:17

_ _ the little owl — or horned owl, as some render it. The common barn owl, which is well known in the East. It is the only bird of its kind here referred to, although the word is thrice mentioned in our version.

_ _ cormorant — supposed to be the gull. [See on Deuteronomy 14:17.]

_ _ the great owl — according to some, the Ibis of the Egyptians. It was well known to the Israelites, and so rendered by the Septuagint (Deuteronomy 14:16; Isaiah 34:11): according to Parkhurst, the bittern, but not determined.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Leviticus 11:9-19.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

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Geneva Bible Translation Notes

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