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Numbers 11:5 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— We remember the fish, which we did eat in Egypt for nought; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlic:
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— We remember the fish, which we did eat in Egypt freely; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlick:
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— “We remember the fish which we used to eat free in Egypt, the cucumbers and the melons and the leeks and the onions and the garlic,
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— We remember the fish which we ate in Egypt freely: the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlic:
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— We remember the fish that we ate in Egypt for nothing; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlic;
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— We remember the fish that we did eat in Egypt, without money,—the cucumbers, and the water-melons, and the leeks and the onions, and the garlick.
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— We have remembered the fish which we do eat in Egypt for nought, the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlick;
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— We remember the fish that we ate in Egypt free cost: the cucumbers come into our mind, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlic.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— We remember the fish which wee did eate in Egypt freely: the cucumbers and the melons, and the leekes, and the onions, and the garlicke.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— We remember the fish, which we ate in Mizraim{gr.Egypt} freely; and the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the garlic, and the onions.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— We remember the fish, which we did eat in Mitzrayim freely; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlick:

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
We remember 2142
{2142} Prime
זָכַר
zakar
{zaw-kar'}
A primitive root; properly to mark (so as to be recognized), that is, to remember; by implication to mention; also (as denominative from H2145) to be male.
z8804
<8804> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Perfect (See H8816)
Count - 12562
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
the fish, 1710
{1710} Prime
דָּגָה
dagah
{daw-gaw'}
Feminine of H1709, and meaning the same.
which x834
(0834) Complement
אֲשֶׁר
'asher
{ash-er'}
A primitive relative pronoun (of every gender and number); who, which, what, that; also (as adverb and conjunction) when, where, how, because, in order that, etc.
we did eat 398
{0398} Prime
אָכַל
'akal
{aw-kal'}
A primitive root; to eat (literally or figuratively).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
in Mixrayim מִצרַיִם 4714
{4714} Prime
מִצְרַיִם
Mitsrayim
{mits-rah'-yim}
Dual of H4693; Mitsrajim, that is, Upper and Lower Egypt.
freely; 2600
{2600} Prime
חִנָּם
chinnam
{khin-nawm'}
From H2580; gratis, that is, devoid of cost, reason or advantage.
x853
(0853) Complement
אֵת
'eth
{ayth}
Apparently contracted from H0226 in the demonstrative sense of entity; properly self (but generally used to point out more definitely the object of a verb or preposition, even or namely).
the cucumbers, 7180
{7180} Prime
קִשֻּׁא
qishshu'
{kish-shoo'}
From an unused root (meaning to be hard); a cucumber (from the difficulty of digestion).
and the melons, 20
{0020} Prime
אֲבַטִּיחַ
'abattiyach
{ab-at-tee'-akh}
Of uncertain derivation; a melon (only plural).
and the leeks, 2682
{2682} Prime
חָצִיר
chatsiyr
{khaw-tseer'}
Perhaps originally the same as H2681, from the greenness of a courtyard; grass; also a leek (collectively).
and the onions, 1211
{1211} Prime
בָּצָל
b@tsel
{beh'-tsel}
From an unused root apparently meaning to peel; an onion.
and the garlick: 7762
{7762} Prime
שׁוּם
shuwm
{shoom}
From an unused root meaning to exhale; garlic (from its rank odor).
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Numbers 11:5

_ _ We remember the fish, which we did eat in Egypt freely — (See on Exodus 7:17). The people of Egypt are accustomed to an almost exclusive diet of fish, either fresh or sun-dried, during the hot season in April and May — the very season when the Israelites were travelling in this desert. Lower Egypt, where were the brick-kilns in which they were employed, afforded great facilities for obtaining fish in the Mediterranean, the lakes, and the canals of the Nile.

_ _ cucumbers — The Egyptian species is smooth, of a cylindrical form, and about a foot in length. It is highly esteemed by the natives and when in season is liberally partaken of, being greatly mellowed by the influence of the sun.

_ _ melons — The watermelons are meant, which grow on the deep, loamy soil after the subsidence of the Nile; and as they afford a juicy and cooling fruit, all classes make use of them for food, drink, and medicine.

_ _ leeks — by some said to be a species of grass cresses, which is much relished as a kind of seasoning.

_ _ onions — the same as ours; but instead of being nauseous and affecting the eyes, they are sweet to the taste, good for the stomach, and form to a large extent the aliment of the laboring classes.

_ _ garlic — is now nearly if not altogether extinct in Egypt although it seems to have grown anciently in great abundance. The herbs now mentioned form a diet very grateful in warm countries where vegetables and other fruits of the season are much used. We can scarcely wonder that both the Egyptian hangers-on and the general body of the Israelites, incited by their clamors, complained bitterly of the want of the refreshing viands in their toilsome wanderings. But after all their experience of the bounty and care of God, their vehement longing for the luxuries of Egypt was an impeachment of the divine arrangements; and if it was the sin that beset them in the desert, it became them more strenuously to repress a rebellious spirit, as dishonoring to God and unbecoming their relation to Him as a chosen people.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

See commentary on Numbers 11:4-15.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Numbers 11:5

Freely — Either without price, for fish was very plentiful, and fishing was there free, or with a very small price. And this is the more probable because the Egyptians might not taste of fish, nor of the leeks and onions, which they worshipped for Gods, and therefore the Israelites, might have them upon cheap terms.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Numbers 11:5

We remember the fish, which we did eat in Egypt (c) freely; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the leeks, and the onions, and the garlick:

(c) For a final price, or good cheap.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
the fish:

Exodus 16:3 And the children of Israel said unto them, Would to God we had died by the hand of the LORD in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the flesh pots, [and] when we did eat bread to the full; for ye have brought us forth into this wilderness, to kill this whole assembly with hunger.
Psalms 17:14 From men [which are] thy hand, O LORD, from men of the world, [which have] their portion in [this] life, and whose belly thou fillest with thy hid [treasure]: they are full of children, and leave the rest of their [substance] to their babes.
Philippians 3:19 Whose end [is] destruction, whose God [is their] belly, and [whose] glory [is] in their shame, who mind earthly things.)

the cucumbers:
In Hebrew, kishshuim, in Arabic, kiththa, Chaldee, keta, and Syriac, kati, a species of cucumber peculiar to Egypt, smooth, of a longish cylindrical shape, and about a foot long. Prosper Alpinus says that it differs from the common sort by its size, colour, and softness; that its leaves are smaller, whiter, softer, and rounder; its fruit larger, greener, smoother, softer, sweeter, and more easy of digestion than ours. Hasselquist describes it in the same manner; and adds, that it is very little watery, but firm like a melon, sweet and cool to the taste, but not so cold as the watermelon, which is meant by the avutichim of the text.
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Ex 16:3. Ps 17:14. Php 3:19.

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