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Psalms 54:1 [study!]

American Standard Version (ASV 1901) [2]
— [[For the Chief Musician; on stringed instruments. Maschil of David; when the Ziphites came and said to Saul, Doth not David hide himself with us?]] Save me, O God, by thy name, And judge me in thy might.
King James Version (KJV 1769)
— [[To the chief Musician on Neginoth, Maschil, [A Psalm] of David, when the Ziphims came and said to Saul, Doth not David hide himself with us?]] Save me, O God, by thy name, and judge me by thy strength.
New American Standard Bible (NASB ©1995)
— [[For the choir director; on stringed instruments. A Maskil of David, when the Ziphites came and said to Saul, “Is not David hiding himself among us?”]] Save me, O God, by Your name, And vindicate me by Your power.
Webster's Revision of the KJB (WEB 1833)
— [[To the chief Musician on Neginoth, Maschil, [A Psalm] of David, when the Ziphims came and said to Saul, Doth not David hide himself with us?]] Save me, O God, by thy name, and judge me by thy strength.
Darby's Translation (DBY 1890)
— [[To the chief Musician. On stringed instruments: an instruction. Of David; when the Ziphites came, and said to Saul, Is not David hiding himself with us?]] O God, by thy name save me, and by thy strength do me justice.
Rotherham's Emphasized Bible (EBR 1902)
— [[To the Chief Musician: with Stringed Instruments. A Psalm of Instruction, of David. When the Ziphites came and said unto Saul, Is not, David, hiding himself, with us?]] O God! by thine own Name, save me, And, by thine own strength, wilt thou vindicate me?
Young's Literal Translation (YLT 1898)
— To the Overseer with stringed instruments.—An instruction, by David, in the coming in of the Ziphim, and they say to Saul, 'Is not David hiding himself with us?' O God, by Thy name save me, and by Thy might judge me.
Douay-Rheims Challoner Revision (DR 1750)
— Unto the end, in verses, understanding for David. When the men of Ziph had come and said to Saul: Is not David hidden with us? [1 Samuel 23:19] Save me, O God, by thy name, and judge me in thy strength.
Original King James Bible (AV 1611) [2]
— [[To the chiefe musician on Neginoth, Maschil, A [Psalme] of Dauid. When the Ziphims came and sayde to Saul: doeth not Dauid hide himselfe with vs?]] Saue me, O God, by thy name, and iudge me by thy strength.
Brenton Greek Septuagint (LXX, Restored Names)
— [[For the end, among Hymns of instruction by David, when the Ziphites came and said to Saul, Lo, is not David hid with us?]] Save me, O God, by thy name, and judge me by thy might.
Full Hebrew Names / Holy Name KJV (2008) [2] [3]
— [[To the chief Musician on Neginoth, Maskil, [A Psalm] of Dawid, when the Zifim came and said to Shaul, Doth not Dawid hide himself with us?]] Save me, O Elohim, by thy name, and judge me by thy strength.

Strong's Numbers & Hebrew NamesHebrew Old TestamentColor-Code/Key Word Studies
[[To the chief Musician 5329
{5329} Prime
נָצַח
natsach
{naw-tsakh'}
A primitive root; properly to glitter from afar, that is, to be eminent (as a superintendent, especially of the Temple services and its music); also (as denominative from H5331), to be permanent.
z8764
<8764> Grammar
Stem - Piel (See H8840)
Mood - Participle (See H8813)
Count - 685
on Nqn נְגִינֹת, 5058
{5058} Prime
נְגִינָה
n@giynah
{neg-ee-naw'}
From H5059; properly instrumental music; by implication a stringed instrument; by extension a poem set to music; specifically an epigram.
Ma$cl מַשׂכִּיל, 4905
{4905} Prime
מַשְׂכִּיל
maskiyl
{mas-keel'}
From H7919; instructive, that is, a didactic poem.
z8688
<8688> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Participle (See H8813)
Count - 857
[A Psalm] of Dwi דָּוִד, 1732
{1732} Prime
דָּוִד
David
{daw-veed'}
From the same as H1730; loving; David, the youngest son of Jesse.
when the Zfm זִיפִים 2130
{2130} Prime
זִיפִי
Ziyphiy
{zee-fee'}
Patrial from H2128; a Ziphite or inhabitant of Ziph.
came 935
{0935} Prime
בּוֹא
bow'
{bo}
A primitive root; to go or come (in a wide variety of applications).
z8800
<8800> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Infinitive (See H8812)
Count - 4888
and said 559
{0559} Prime
אָמַר
'amar
{aw-mar'}
A primitive root; to say (used with great latitude).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
to l שָׁאוּל, 7586
{7586} Prime
שָׁאוּל
Sha'uwl
{shaw-ool'}
Passive participle of H7592; asked; Shaul, the name of an Edomite and two Israelites.
Doth not x3808
(3808) Complement
לֹא
lo'
{lo}
lo; a primitive particle; not (the simple or abstract negation); by implication no; often used with other particles.
Dwi דָּוִד 1732
{1732} Prime
דָּוִד
David
{daw-veed'}
From the same as H1730; loving; David, the youngest son of Jesse.
hide y5641
[5641] Standard
סָתַר
cathar
{saw-thar'}
A primitive root; to hide (by covering), literally or figuratively.
z8693
<8693> Grammar
Stem - Hithpael (See H8819)
Mood - Participle (See H8813)
Count - 139
himself x5641
(5641) Complement
סָתַר
cathar
{saw-thar'}
A primitive root; to hide (by covering), literally or figuratively.
with x5973
(5973) Complement
עִם
`im
{eem}
From H6004; adverb or preposition, with (that is, in conjunction with), in varied applications; specifically equally with; often with prepositional prefix (and then usually unrepresented in English).
us?]] Save 3467
{3467} Prime
יָשַׁע
yasha`
{yaw-shah'}
A primitive root; properly to be open, wide or free, that is, (by implication) to be safe; causatively to free or succor.
z8685
<8685> Grammar
Stem - Hiphil (See H8818)
Mood - Imperative (See H8810)
Count - 731
me, O lhm אֱלֹהִים, 430
{0430} Prime
אֱלֹהִים
'elohiym
{el-o-heem'}
Plural of H0433; gods in the ordinary sense; but specifically used (in the plural thus, especially with the article) of the supreme God; occasionally applied by way of deference to magistrates; and sometimes as a superlative.
by thy name, 8034
{8034} Prime
שֵׁם
shem
{shame}
A primitive word (perhaps rather from H7760 through the idea of definite and conspicuous position; compare H8064); an appellation, as a mark or memorial of individuality; by implication honor, authority, character.
and judge 1777
{1777} Prime
דִּין
diyn
{deen}
A primitive root (compare H0113); to rule; by implication to judge (as umpire); also to strive (as at law).
z8799
<8799> Grammar
Stem - Qal (See H8851)
Mood - Imperfect (See H8811)
Count - 19885
me by thy strength. 1369
{1369} Prime
גְּבוּרָה
g@buwrah
{gheb-oo-raw'}
Feminine passive participle from the same as H1368; force (literally or figuratively); by implication valor, victory.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Commentary

Psalms 54:1

_ _ Psalms 54:1-7. See on Psalms 4:1, title; see on Psalms 32:1, title; for the history, see 1 Samuel 23:19, 1 Samuel 23:29; 1 Samuel 26:1-25. After an earnest cry for help, the Psalmist promises praise in the assurance of a hearing.

_ _ by thy name — (Psalms 5:11), specially, power.

_ _ judge me — as in Psalms 7:8; Psalms 26:1.

Matthew Henry's Commentary

Psalms 54:1-3

_ _ We may observe here, 1. The great distress that David was now in, which the title gives an account of. The Ziphim came of their own accord, and informed Saul where David was, with a promise to deliver him into his hand. One would have thought that when David had retired into the country he would not be pursued, into a desert country he would not be discovered, and into his own country he would not be betrayed; and yet it seems he was. Never let a good man expect to be safe an easy till he comes to heaven. How treacherous, how officious, were these Ziphim! It is well that God is faithful, for men are not to be trusted, Micah 7:5. 2. His prayer to God for succour and deliverance, Psalms 54:1, Psalms 54:2. He appeals to God's strength, by which he was able to help him, and to his name, by which he was engaged to help him, and begs he would save him from his enemies and judge him, that is, plead his cause and judge for him. David has no other plea to depend upon than God's name, no other power to depend upon than God's strength, and those he makes his refuge and confidence. This would be the effectual answer of his prayers (Psalms 54:2), which even in his flight, when he had not opportunity for solemn address to God, he was ever and anon lifting up to heaven: Hear my prayer, which comes from my heart, and give ear to the words of my mouth. 3. His plea, which is taken from the character of his enemies, Psalms 54:3. (1.) They are strangers; such were the Ziphites, unworthy the name of Israelites. “They have used me more basely and barbarously than the Philistines themselves would have done.” The worst treatment may be expected from those who, having broken through the bonds of relation and alliance, make themselves strangers. (2.) They are oppressors; such was Saul, who, as a king, should have used his power for the protection of all his good subjects, but abused it for their destruction. Nothing is so grievous as oppression in the seat of judgment, Ecclesiastes 3:16. Paul's greatest perils were by his own countrymen and by false brethren (2 Corinthians 11:26), and so were David's. (3.) They were very formidable and threatening; they not only hated him and wished him ill, but they rose up against him in a body, joining their power to do him a mischief. (4.) They were very spiteful and malicious: They seek after my soul; they hunt for the precious life; no less will satisfy them. We may, in faith, pray that God would not by his providence give success, lest it should look like giving countenance, to such cruel bloody men. (5.) They were very profane and atheistical, and, for this reason, he thought God was concerned in honour to appear against them: They have not set God before them, that is, they have quite cast off the thoughts of God; they do not consider that his eye is upon them, that, in fighting against his people, they fight against him, nor have they any dread of the certain fatal consequences of such an unequal engagement. Note, From those who do not set God before them no good is to be expected; nay, what wickedness will not such men be guilty of? What bonds of nature, or friendship, or gratitude, or covenant, will hold those that have broken through the fear of God? SelahMark this. Let us all be sure to set God before us at all times; for, if we do not we are in danger of becoming desperate.

John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Psalms 54:1

Name — By thy own strength. Judge — Plead my cause.

Geneva Bible Translation Notes

Psalms 54:1

"To the chief Musician on Neginoth, Maschil, [A Psalm] of David, when the Ziphims came and said to Saul, Doth not David hide himself with us?" Save me, O God, (a) by thy name, and judge me by thy strength.

(a) He declares that when all means fail, God will deliver even by miracle, they who call to him with an upright conscience.

Cross-Reference Topical ResearchStrong's Concordance
judge:

Psalms 26:1 [[[A Psalm] of David.]] Judge me, O LORD; for I have walked in mine integrity: I have trusted also in the LORD; [therefore] I shall not slide.
Psalms 43:1-2 Judge me, O God, and plead my cause against an ungodly nation: O deliver me from the deceitful and unjust man. ... For thou [art] the God of my strength: why dost thou cast me off? why go I mourning because of the oppression of the enemy?
Psalms 99:4 The king's strength also loveth judgment; thou dost establish equity, thou executest judgment and righteousness in Jacob.
Proverbs 23:11 For their redeemer [is] mighty; he shall plead their cause with thee.
Jeremiah 50:34 Their Redeemer [is] strong; the LORD of hosts [is] his name: he shall throughly plead their cause, that he may give rest to the land, and disquiet the inhabitants of Babylon.
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Ps 26:1; 43:1; 99:4. Pv 23:11. Jr 50:34.

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